Online lecture topics for 8 October #spm2122

Live Tweet topics for 8 October 2013 that starts at 1230 (12:30 PM) Perth time.

The topics will all be listed below with relevant links, but the questions will remain secret until the live chat.

The rationale for this classroom assessment item is:

-To uncover whether the use of social media can be used to foster student engagement in university classroom settings

-To analyse whether a micro-blogging service could enhance:

-the co-creation of unit content,

-enable real-world examples to be brought into the classroom, and

-foster engagement with unit materials

SPM2122 has two textbooks that are used. They are:

Shilbury, D., Quick, S., & Westerbeek, H. (2009) Strategic sport marketing (3rd ed.). Sydney: Allen &

Unwin. See: http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=94&book=9781741756265

Smith, A. C. T. (2008). Introduction to Sport Marketing. Sydney: Elsevier. See:

http://www.elsevier.com/books/introduction-to-sport-marketing/smith/978-0-7506-8685-3

All questions will come from unit (course) materials that were discussed in seminars from week 6 to week 10. Please review the relevant chapters from our reading list, which was:

 

Week 6 please read Chapters 5 and 9
Week 7 please read Chapter 11
Week 8 Please read Chapter 13
Week 9 please read Chapter 14
Week 10 please read Chapter 15 (also live tweet lecture)

Topic 1:

Shilbury et al (2009) suggest that there are four levels of a product (core, facilitating, supporting, and augmented product), which help consumers to satisfy a need or want through consumption (for example, buying season tickets to one’s favourite team).

In our online lecture, we will discuss only supporting products that can add value to the core product and aid to differentiate it from competitors (i.e. membership benefits to season members, access to special events, discounted team merchandise, and many others).

You may be asked to discuss and/or give examples about:

  1. Supporting products that add value to products for people to do sport (i.e. running shoes, a basketball, etc. (these are only examples)
  2. Supporting products that add value for people who purchase season memberships to sport

 

Topic 2:

Distinguished sport marketer Lawrence Wenner (1989) noted that “If the broadcasters [or sport marketers] have done their job well, the sports fan will be attentively viewing when a commercial message appears” (p. 15), which formed part of our discussion in week 7 on sport media and marketing. During our discussion on television, we discussed the ever-increasing avoidance of commercials (during ad breaks) through zapping, online streaming, and digital video recorders.

In our online lecture, we will discuss how contemporary media embed marketing messages into the coverage of sporting events to ensure that a sport fan is “attentively viewing” the marketing message when it appears on screen.

You may be asked to give examples about:

  1. New ways in which sports marketing message appear during game play of sporting events/matches
  2. Listing different ways in which you see marketing messages during sport events/games

 

Topic 3:

In week 7, we discussed the construction of commercial media stories and stories needed to:

  • Contain information to attact public interests
  • Contain some newsworthiness, relationship or meaning to publics
  • “Sell” stories to attract viewers or readers to make money.

Because, the commercial media’s main objective is to attract as large a market as possible to on-sell viewers to advertisers and sponsors in the form of ratings. In our discussion, we focused on how stories needed to connect to the viewer and we watched that clip from Seinfeld to illustrate this. The focus of our online discussion may be and you may be asked for examples of:

  1. How the broadcasts of sport matches contain many varied storylines to attract viewers
  2. How stories are personalised to enable consumers to connect with them

 

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Twitter Lecture topics for 27 August 2013 #SPM2122

As many of my readers know, I actively use twitter in my university classroom teaching. In particular, I use it most in my Sport Marketing unit (tagged #spm2122). Twice during the semester, a lecture is replaced by an online discussion on Twitter. The focus of the online lecture is the content from the four weeks prior.  Here are the four topics that will be discussed in a QandA fashion on the 27th of August 2013 that starts at 12:30PM Perth time.

 

Live Tweet topics for 27 August 2013 that starts at 1230 (12:30 PM) Perth time.

The topics will all be listed below with relevant links, but the questions will remain secret until the live chat.

The rationale for this classroom assessment item is:

-To uncover whether the use of social media can be used to foster student engagement in university classroom settings

-To analyse whether a micro-blogging service could enhance:

-the co-creation of unit content,

-enable real-world examples to be brought into the classroom, and

-foster engagement with unit materials

SPM2122 has two textbooks that are used. They are:

Shilbury, D., Quick, S., & Westerbeek, H. (2009) Strategic sport marketing (3rd ed.). Sydney: Allen &

Unwin. See: http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=94&book=9781741756265

Smith, A. C. T. (2008). Introduction to Sport Marketing. Sydney: Elsevier. See:

http://www.elsevier.com/books/introduction-to-sport-marketing/smith/978-0-7506-8685-3

All questions will come from unit (course) materials that were discussed in seminars from week 1 to week 4. Please review the relevant chapters from our reading list, which was:

Week 1 please read Chapters 1 and 2 from the Shilbury et al text

Week 2 please read Chapters 1 & 2 from the Smith text

Week 3 please read Chapter 3 from the Shilbury et al text

Week 4 please read Chapter 4 from the Shilbury et al text

 

Topic 1:

The Smith textbook outlines two streams of sport marking, which is unique to the sports industry. “Sport marketing is the application of marketing concepts to sport products and services, and the marketing of non-sport products through an association to sport. Sport marketing therefore has two key features. First, it is the application of general marketing practices to sport-related products and services. Second, it is the marketing of other consumer and industrial products or services through sport. Like any form of marketing, sport marketing seeks to fulfil the needs and wants of consumers. It achieves this by providing sport services and sport-related products to consumers. However, sport marketing is unlike conventional marketing in that it also has the ability to encourage the consumption of non-sport products and services by association” (Smith, 2008, p. 3). In our online discussion, we will discuss both of these concepts and apply them to sport marketing using social media.

You may be asked to give examples about:
-Marketing of sport on social media
-Marketing through sport on social media using a sport team’s account

 

Topic 2:

Smith (2008) suggests that “the idea of branding is closely linked with positioning. A brand is like an identifying badge, often reinforced by a name or a logo that helps consumers recognise a product or an organisation. A brand becomes linked with consumers’ opinions and perceptions of a sport product and organisation” (p. 115). In week 2, we discussed positioning strategies of various brands.

In the discussion of this topic, you will be asked to give examples of brand attributes “(aspects of the brand that are defining, unique and special to each organisation)” (Smith, p. 118) of several sporting teams. On page 118 of the Smith text, there is an interactive case that might help you in preparing for this topic.

You may be asked to give examples of:
-Unique elements of your favourite sports team
-Distinctive partnerships between a company and an athlete
-Unique elements of a sport company (shoes, bats, media, etc.)

Topic 3:

In week four, we discussed three ways in which sport organisations can collect data. These were: General market data, individual consumer’s data, and competitors and/or participants’ data.

General market data include all the information which relates to the broad environment in which the sport operates. Individual consumer’s data concerns their attitudes and behaviours related to a specific sport product or service. A third source of information for sporting organisations relates to competitors and their participants. It is critical that sporting organisations not only be aware of who their competitors are but also know the consumers of a rival’s products or services (adapted from Shilbury et al., 2009, p. 65).

In our discussion on this topic, we will tweet about the different methods that contemporary sport organisations use to collect data and use new media examples

You may be asked to give examples about:
-How sport teams can incentivise consumers to fill in all items in a form
-The tactics sports organisations use to accurately data mine

 

Topic 4:

The Big 5 Sport Motives represent  a comprehensive view of major psychological inputs that represent core benefits consumer receive from engaging in sport consumption (adapted from Shilbury et al., 2009, p. 49). Various research (Beaton et al., 2007; James et al., 2006) has found that there are “five main psychological benefits that sport consumers desire from a sport experience” (Shilbury et al, 2009, p. 48). These are: Social interaction, performance, excitement, esteem, and diversion.

In our discussion of this topic, we will discuss how sport marketers use the Big 5 sport motives in an attempt to persuade individuals to consume a sporting experience.

You may be asked to give examples about:
-Ads that feature one or more of the Big 5 sport motives to entice consumers to attend a sporting match
-Ads that use the Big 5 sport motives to entice viewership of an event
-Ads using the Big 5 sport motives in an attempt to get people to participate in sport

Topics for #Twitter lecture 8 May 2013 at 12:35PM

Live Tweet topics for 8 May 2013 that starts at 1230 (12:30 PM) Perth time.

The topics will all be listed below with relevant links, but the questions will remain secret until the live chat.

The rationale for this classroom assessment item is:

-To uncover whether the use of social media can be used to foster student engagement in university classroom settings

-To analyse whether a micro-blogging service could enhance:

-the co-creation of unit content,

-enable real-world examples to be brought into the classroom, and

-foster engagement with unit materials

SPM2122 has two textbooks that are used. They are:

Shilbury, D., Quick, S., & Westerbeek, H. (2009) Strategic sport marketing (3rd ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin. See: http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=94&book=9781741756265

Smith, A. C. T. (2008). Introduction to Sport Marketing. Sydney: Elsevier. See:  http://www.elsevier.com/books/introduction-to-sport-marketing/smith/978-0-7506-8685-3

All questions will come from unit (course) materials that were discussed in seminars from week 6 to week 10. Please review the relevant chapters from our reading list, which was:

 Week 6 please read Chapters 5 and 9
Week 7 please read Chapter 11
Week 8 Please read Chapter 13
Week 9 please read Chapter 14
Week 10 please read Chapter 15 (also live tweet lecture)

Topic 1 (carried over from Week 5):

Smith (2008) suggests that “The idea of branding is closely linked with positioning. A brand is like an identifying badge, often reinforced by a name or a logo that helps consumers recognise a product or an organisation. A brand becomes linked with consumers’ opinions and perceptions of a sport product and organisation” (p. 115). In week 2, we discussed positioning strategies of various brands.

In the discussion of this topic, you will be asked to give examples of brand attributes “(aspects of the brand that are defining, unique and special to each organisation)” (Smith, p. 118) of several sporting teams. On page 118 of the Smith text, there is an interactive case that might help you in preparing for this topic.

You may be asked to give examples about:

  1. Unique features of your favourite sports team
  2. Unique features of your favourite sports league/event/competition
  3. Unique features of a sport company

Topic 2:

Shilbury et al (2009) suggest that there are four levels of a product (core, facilitating, supporting, and augmented product), which help consumers to satisfy a need or want through consumption (for example, buying season tickets to one’s favourite team).

In our online lecture, we will discuss only supporting products that can add value to the core product and aid to differentiate it from competitors (for example, membership benefits to season members, access to special events, discounted team merchandise, and many others).

You may be asked to discuss and/or give examples about:

  1. Supporting products that add value to products for people to do sport (i.e. running shoes, a basketball, etc. (these are only examples)
  2. Supporting products that add value for people who purchase season memberships to sport

Topic 3:

Distinguished sport marketer Lawrence Wenner (1989) noted that “If the broadcasters [or sport marketers] have done their job well, the sports fan will be attentively viewing when a commercial message appears” (p. 15), which formed part of our discussion in week 7 on sport media and marketing. During our discussion on television, we discussed the ever-increasing avoidance of commercials (during ad breaks) through zapping, online streaming, and digital video recorders.

In our online lecture, we will discuss how contemporary media embed marketing messages into the coverage of sporting events to ensure that a sport fan is “attentively viewing” the marketing message when it appears on screen.

You may be asked to give examples about:

  1. New ways in which sports marketing message appear during game play of sporting events/matches
  2. Listing different ways in which you see marketing messages during sport events/games

Live Tweet topics for 27 March 2012 that starts at 1230 (12:30 PM) Perth time. #SPM2122

Live Tweet topics for 27 March 2012 that starts at 1230 (12:30 PM) Perth time.

The topics will all be listed below with relevant links, but the questions will remain secret until the live chat.

The rationale for this classroom assessment item is twofold:

1. To uncover whether the use of social media can be used to foster student engagement in university classroom settings

2. To analyse whether a micro-blogging service could enhance:

  1. -the co-creation of unit content,
  2. -enable real-world examples to be brought into the classroom, and
  3. -foster engagement with unit materials

SPM2122 has two textbooks that are used. They are:

Shilbury, D., Quick, S., & Westerbeek, H. (2009) Strategic sport marketing (3rd ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin.

See: http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=94&book=9781741756265

Smith, A. C. T. (2008). Introduction to Sport Marketing. Sydney: Elsevier.

See: http://www.elsevier.com/books/introduction-to-sport-marketing/smith/978-0-7506-8685-3

All questions will come from unit (course) materials that were discussed in seminars from week 1 to week 4. Please review the relevant chapters from our reading list, which was:

Week 1 please read Chapters 1 and 2 from the Shilbury et al text

Week 2 please read Chapters 1 & 2 from the Smith text

Week 3 please read Chapter 3 from the Shilbury et al text

Week 4 please read Chapter 4 from the Shilbury et al text

Topic 1:

Chapter 1 of the Shilbury et al. text outlines seven components of the marketing mix (the 7 Ps). The “seven component strategies of the marketing mix [are] composed of the traditional 4Ps of marketing plus the 3Ps of service—process, people and physical evidence (Shilbury et al., 2009, p. 6).

Please review these and be prepared to discuss and apply the 7 Ps to contemporary sport marketing examples.

Topic 2:
Smith (2008) discusses  nine unique characteristics of the competitive sport product. “Sport is business, but it is a special form of business. The key is to understand the special features of sport and their relevance to meeting the needs of sport consumers” (Smith, p. 21).

Smith describes the special features of sport and emphases how those factors make sport appealing to consumers, but would normally be considered unattractive in most products. These features are important for sport marketers to understand because of the need to balance the potential to dissatisfy sport consumers by overemphasising marketing and commercial gain, against the attraction of keeping the unique characteristics of sport alive for them.

In this topic’s discuss, we will outline how sport marketers can use the nine special features of sport in an attempt to foster emotion in the sporting exeperience.

Topic 3:

In week four, we discussed three ways in which sport organisations can collect data. These were: General market data, individual consumers data, and competitors and/or participants’ data.

General market data include all the information which relates to the broad environment in which the sport operates. Individual consumers data concerns their attitudes and behaviours related to a specific sport product or service. A third source of information for sporting organisations relates to competitors and their participants. It is critical that sporting organisations not only be aware of who their competitors are but also know the consumers of a rival’s products or services (adapted from Shilbury et al., 2009, p. 65).

In our discussion on this topic, we will tweet about the different methods that contemporary sport organisations use to collect data and use new media examples

Topic 4:

Smith (2008) suggests that “The idea of branding is closely linked with positioning. A brand is like an identifying badge, often reinforced by a name or a logo that helps consumers recognise a product or an organisation. A brand becomes linked with consumers’ opinions and perceptions of a sport product and organisation” (p. 115). In week 2, we discussed positioning strategies of various brands.

In the discussion of this topic, you will be asked to give examples of brand attributes “(aspects of the brand that are defining, unique and special to each organisation)” (Smith, p. 118) of several sporting teams. On page 118 of the Smith text, there is an interactive case that might help you in preparing for this topic.

From Social Networking to Professional Networking: (Re)introducing your Students to Twitter

This post is a copy/paste of an accepted 60-minute Professional Preparation and Teaching Sport Management abstract that will be presented at the 2013 NASSM conference in Austin, Texas, USA.

NASSM 2013 ABSTRACT PROPOSAL

Authors:

Heather A. Muir, Bowling Green State University hmuir@bgsu.edu 419-372-7230

Olan K. M. Scott, Edith Cowan University o.scott@ecu.edu.au +61450764966

Naila Jinnah, Queen’s University njinnah@gmail.com 5149665510

Title:

From Social Networking to Professional Networking: (Re)introducing your Students to Twitter

Abstract:

Since the advent of the Internet and the proliferation of social media, consumers have been afforded new ways to communicate with businesses, celebrities, athletes, and other Internet users. Social media usage in the sports industry is an ever-growing field of research (Clavio & Kian, 2010; Hutchins, 2011; Hutchins & Mikosza, 2010; Pegoraro, 2010; Sanderson & Kassing, 2011). Twitter, in particular, has enabled interaction between fans and members of the sports industry as well as with sport organizations, athletes and other stakeholders such as sponsors and non-profit organizations (Hambrick, Simmons, Greenhalgh, & Greenwell, 2010).

Twitter can also be used as an educational and professional networking tool. Organized conversations on Twitter are an example of how social networking can help build digital bridges across geographic boundaries. These conversations are more commonly known as Twitter chats and are scheduled, virtual gatherings where people on Twitter discuss something of interest to them, using an established subject #hashtag to keep track of the conversation (Spinks, 2009). Though social networking relationships are created, fostered, and maintained in a virtual space, they can be just as “real” or genuine as offline relationships in their impact on the individual (Booth, 2010; Guimarães, 2005; Mackay, 2005). Therefore, the bonds that form between those who interact on Twitter chats may produce connections between people of various backgrounds and across networks that may otherwise not have been linked (“A world of connections”, 2010; Chao, Parker, & Fontana, 2011). For example, a sport management student who actively participates in sport industry chats such as #sbchat, #smsportschat, or #sportsprchat may impress top executives or academics, putting them in a prime position to then connect over future job opportunities.

Twitter chats are also increasingly being integrated into post-secondary teaching plans because they promote cooperative, collaborative, and long-term information retention (Angelo, 1993; Chao, Parker, & Fontana, 2011; Dobler, 2012; Millis, 2007; Parker & Chao, 2007). Studies show that today’s students benefit from a variety of pedagogical approaches that promote active learning (Bart 2011; Junco, Heibergert, & Locken, 2010). Those who are digital natives “prefer multi-tasking and non-linear access to information, they have a low tolerance for lectures and prefer active rather than passive learning, and they rely heavily on social media for social and professional interactions and accessing information” (McCarthy, 2010; as cited in Chao, Parker, & Fontana, 2011, p.324). As students are typically already familiar with Twitter and use it regularly, they recognize how effective this participatory tool can be for their education as well (Prensky, 2007; Weisgerber & Butler, 2010). Twitter integration in the classroom has also been shown to help students develop peer support, learning communities, and professional networks, as well as to increase student engagement and grades (Junco, Heibergert, & Loken, 2010; Retelny, Birnholtz, & Hancock, 2012; ScienceDaily, 2009).

The purpose of this workshop is to: 1) show educators how Twitter can be used as a pedagogical tool for post-secondary learning in sport management, and 2) provide a hands-on Twitter chat learning experience for educators and students who may be interested in participating in educational and/or industry chats. The workshop will take place in a Wi-Fi-enabled room (if available at the conference) and participants will be asked to bring a device through which they can access their Twitter account (cellphone, tablet, or laptop). The workshop will provide strategies for running a Twitter chat in the classroom. The format, grading, and gauging of students’ experiences will be discussed, and examples of best practices will be given based on feedback from professors, students, and industry professionals who currently use Twitter chats for educational and/or professional purposes. The session will conclude with a question and answer Twitter chat that will familiarize participants with the unique experience of tweeting with others who are in the same physical space.

Abstract Type: Teaching

Abstract Category: Professional Preparation, Teaching Sport Management

Status of Work: In-progress

Presentation Type: 60-minute workshop