Academic Publications (as of 21/8/17)

Academic Publications:

Book Chapters:

2: Scott, O. K., M., Naylor, M. & Bruffy, K. (2017). Social Media, Fan Engagement and Global Sport. In N. Scheulenkorf & S. Frawley (Eds.). Critical Issues in Global Sport Management (pp. 141-151). London, UK: Routledge. Purchase

1: Scott, O. K., M., Naylor, M. & Bruffy, K. (2016). The importance of social media in sport organizations. In T. Byers (Ed.), Contemporary Issues in Sport Management: A Critical Introduction (pp. 363-379). London, UK: Sage Publications. Purchase

Journal Articles:

16: Sharpe, S., Kunkel, T., Scott, O., K., M. & Beaton, A. (in press). Managing digital content for a professional sport team: An Interview with Bill Yole, Social Media Coordinator and Webmaster of the ACT Brumbies Super Rugby franchise. International Journal of Sport Communication, 10(3), 318-324. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate

15: Billings, A., C., Scott, O., K., M., Brown, K.A., Devlin, M.D., & Lewis, M. (in press). The patriotism down under: Nationalized qualities and Australian media consumption of the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. International Review for the Sociology of Sport. Accepted 8 June 2017. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate

14: Xu, Q., Billings, A., C., Scott, O., K., M., Lewis, M. & Sharpe, S. (in press). Gender Differences through the Lens of Rio: Australian Olympic Coverage of the 2016 Rio Summer Olympic Games. International Review for the Sociology of Sport. Accepted 26 April 2017. DOI: 10.1177/1012690217710690. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate

13: Li, B., Dittmore, S. & Scott, O., K., M. (in press). Points of attachment on social media: Exploring differences between Chinese and Western sport fans. Asia Pacific Journal of Sport and Social Science. Accepted 7 March 2017. DOI: 10.1080/21640599.2017.1304503. Download –  publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate

12: Scott, O., K., M., Billings, A., C., Harris, J. & Vincent, J. (in press). Using self-categorization theory to uncover the framing of the 2015 Rugby World Cup: A cross-cultural comparison of three nations’ newspapers. International Review for the Sociology of Sport. Accepted 7 February 2017. DOI: 10.1177/1012690217697476. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

11: Scott, O., K., M., Beaton, A., Kunkel, T. & Sharpe, S. (2017). Media strategies to engage stakeholders and navigate crises: An Interview with Paul Glover, Media Manager of the ACT Brumbies Super Rugby Franchise. International Journal of Sport Communication, 10(2), 224-232. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate

10: Li, B., Stokowski, S., Dittmore, S. W., & Scott, O., K., M. (2017). For better or for worse: The impact of social media on Chinese sports journalists. Communication and Sport, 5(3), 311-330. DOI: 10.1177/2167479515617279. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

9: Pegoraro, A., Scott, O., K., M., & Burch, L. (2017). Strategic use of Facebook to Build Brand Awareness: A Case Study of Two National Sport Organizations. International Journal of Public Administration in the Digital Age, 4(1), 69-87. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate

8: Kunkel, T., Scott, O., K., M. & Beaton, A. (2016). Interview with Michael Lahoud, professional soccer player: Lessons of personal athlete branding via social media. International Journal of Sport Communication, 9(4), 415-423. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

7: Scott, O., K., M. & Kunkel, T. (2016). Using self-categorization theory to uncover the framing of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of two national newspapers. Journal of Sports Media, 11(1), 123-144. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

6: Li, B., Stokowski, S., Dittmore, S. W., & Scott, O., K., M. (2016). How Mediated Sporting Events Constituted Nationalism? An Analysis of Chinese Newspapers Covering the 2014 Incheon Asian Games. International Journal of Sport Communication, 9(1), 79-96. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

5: Willson, G., Sanders, D. & Scott, O., K., M. (2015). In the news: An investigation into Australian print media reports on Bali. Journal of Tourism Challenges and Trends, 8(2), 105-122. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

4: Scott, O., K., M. & Stanway, A. (2015). Tweeting the lecture: How social media can increase student engagement in higher education. Sport Management Education Journal, 9(2), 91-101. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

3: Scott, O. K. M., Hill, B., & Zakus, D. (2014). Framing the 2007 National Basketball Association finals: An analysis of commentator discourse. International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 49(6), 728-744. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

2: Scott, O., K., M., Bradshaw, R. & Larkin, P. (2013). Exploring ways in which social networkers contribute to online groups: A case study of one Facebook group’s discussion of Australian broadcaster Channel 9 during the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. First Monday, 18(4), http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/4316/3426. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

1: Scott, O. K. M., Hill, B., & Zakus, D. (2012). When the home team is not featured: Comparison of commentary between two television network broadcasts of the 2006 FIFA World Cup. Sport Management Review, 15(1), 23-32. Download – publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

Full Conference Papers

7:  Xu, Q., Scott, O., K., M., Billings, A., C., Lewis, M. & Sharpe, S. (accepted). Gender Differences Through the Lens of Rio: Australian Olympic Coverage of the 2016 Rio Summer Olympic Games. Sports Communication Interest Group Division/Interest Group – Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, August, Chicago, USA.

6: Li, B. Scott, O., K., M., & Ditmore, S. (accepted). Twitter and Olympics: Exploring Factors which Impact Fans Following American Olympic Governing Bodies. Sports Communication Interest Group Division/Interest Group – Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, August, Chicago, USA.

5: Billings, A.C., Scott, O., K., M., Brown, K.A., Devlin, M.D., & Lewis, M. (2017 – accepted). The patriotism down under: Nationalized qualities and Australian media consumption of the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. International Communication Association, May, San Diego, USA.

4: Watkins, J. Pegoraro, A., Scott, O., K., M. (2015). “My feckin heart!!”: differences in cross-platform sports fan conversation. Refereed proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association conference: Rethinking communication, space and identity, ISSN 1448-4331, available at: http://www.anzca.net/conferences/past-conferences/, 8-10 July, Queenstown, New Zealand.

3: Scott, O., K., M., & Kunkel, T. (2010). Selling the five rings: An analysis of the pictorial representations of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games national print coverage from Canada and Australia. Full paper presented at The European Academy of Management conference. 21 May, Rome, Italy.

2: Scott, O., K., M., Zakus, D. & Hill, B. (2009). Thematic Framing of the 2007 National Basketball Association Finals: An analysis of announcer discourse during a series of discrete yet linked events. Full paper presented at the Sport Marketing Association conference. 29 October, Cleveland, USA. Best paper finalist.

1: Scott, O., K., M., Zakus, D. & Hill, B. (2008). The promotion of marquee personalities to increase viewership in a world sporting event. Full paper presented at the Sport Marketing Association conference. 16 July, Gold Coast, Australia.

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Footy finals fever

Recently, my workplace put out a media release on its experts interested in a variety of areas around the footy finals (AFL/NRL) that are starting up this week in Australia. I was luckily enough to be included in a note on how sport teams use social media to bring their fans closer together during the pointy end of the season.

The paragraph read: “Social media has altered the relationship between teams and their fans, bringing them closer together and fostering a more personal connection. Online engagement at the business end of the season is crucial to a team’s success. Whether it’s messages of support from the fans to the players or a club’s rallying cry to its supporters, social media has an important role to play. Dr Olan Scott, whose research focuses on fan engagement in social media, can explain just how valuable a tool Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn can be.”

The media release can be read here

Social media and sports journalism

Recently, I appeared on ABC Radio Canberra to talk about social media and sports and a press release was put out about some of the research I have done on the impact of social media on sports journalists. Below follows the press release and its original link is here

A link to my research papers is available here and the press release about this research is link number 10 of my journal articles

Press release written by Marcus Butler

16 June 2017: It’s one of the plum gigs in journalism, but even sports reporting isn’t immune to the increasing influence of social media in newsrooms around the world.

The rise of a variety of social media platforms, such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter has changed the way journalists work and sports reporters are no exception.

Long envied for getting paid to watch fixtures and mix with elite athletes and coaches, sports writers are now being forced to change the way they operate to remain relevant.

University of Canberra Assistant Professor of Sports Management Olan Scott, who has been researching the impact of social media on the sports industry, said the traditional gatekeeper role of the sports journalist has diminished.

“In the past, journalists would invest a lot of time building relationships with various teams, officials and players to gather information from these sources,” Dr Scott said.

“Now any information the clubs or athletes want their fans to know can be delivered to them via social media.

Dr Scott recently spoke about sportspeople and social media on ABC Radio Canberra, alongside former University of Canberra Capitals star Carly Wilson, and ABC sports journalist and commentator Tim Gavel.

“It builds a two-way relationship between fans and the sportspeople they follow, and that can lead to better ticket or merchandise sales. It can also expose athletes to more people, which may elicit more lucrative sponsorship deals.”

Dr Scott argued sports reporters must re-examine their role as a result of the digital revolution.

As part of his research, he has analysed the way sports journalists in China are using social media as a tool. He said a lot of the challenges faced by Chinese writers were similar to the issues facing journalists in Australia.

“Western Social media platforms are restricted in China, but as a country it still has the highest number of internet users in the world and its local social platforms, Weibo and WeChat, rank well in the top 10 for number of users,” he said.

“Some of the journalists who participated in the research told me they’ve even been directed by teams and athletes to get their information from the social media feed, rather than trying to schedule an interview.”

The adoption of social media is a reflection of the changing nature of the sports industry and the increasing need to convert fans into paying members and spectators rather than just casual consumers.

Dr Scott said when teams and players can engage directly with fans it increases their emotional investment in the club and also has the potential to boost their financial investment.

“Accessing your main supporter base directly cuts out the sports reporter ‘gatekeepers’, it short circuits their entire role,” he said.

“As in China, Australian reporters have to adapt to this disruptive technology. They need to be willing to analyse or critique team or player performances, which the club or athlete may be less likely to do themselves.

“It is crucial sports reporters draw on their accumulated knowledge to avoid the risk of becoming obsolete.”

AMP Tomorrow Fund Grant

On 16 May 2017, I submitted a grant application to the AMP Tomorrow Fund’s grant round for 2018 projects. This was really fun to put together and was also quite the challenge as question answers were limited to 2000 characters, so around 300-400 words. Brevity was definitely my friend for this application, which was a nice change from normal academic work where verbosity is the norm. Fingers crossed, I’m successful with this grant application!

I redacted my application number, hence the black blob.

IMG_20170516_160217

LESSONS OF PERSONAL ATHLETE BRANDING VIA SOCIAL MEDIA

Since 2015, I’ve been involved with some work in athlete branding, media management, and crisis communication with my colleague Thilo Kunkel of Temple University. The first of our publications was published in late 2016 about the work we have done with Michael Lahoud, who is a professional currently playing for Miami FC in the North American Soccer League (NASL). He was born in Sierra Leone, where he escaped civil war when he was six years old. As a refugee, soccer helped him to integrate in the United States of America, where he was drafted as the ninth overall pick in the 2009 Major League Soccer (MLS) Superdraft. He is a community advocate who uses his sport to support charitable efforts, such as The Wall Las Memorias project, the NoH8 campaign, and Schools for Salone. He was the Major League Soccer Humanitarian of the Year in 2010, and together with Kei Kamara, he is the recipient of the 2015 FIFPro World Players’ Union Merit Award (a prize worth $25,000), which recognized their involvement in the Schools for Salone project that builds schools in their home country of Sierra Leone. His brand is Soccer can make a difference. This interview consists of two parts, with the first part being conducted in December 2015 when he was a player of the MLS team Philadelphia Union, and the second part being conducted in July 2016 after two transfers within 4 months. The interviews provide an overview of his approach to athlete branding via social media, and its impact on his career.

You can read and download the full article here: publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.

The Impact of Social Media on Chinese Sports Journalists

Over the past few years, I’ve been involved in some research on social media in China. In my newest published study, the research team (Bo (Norman) Li, Steve Dittmore, and Sarah Stokowski and me) studied the impact of social media on Chinese sports journalists. The majority of our survey respondents noted that they actively used social media to monitor what was occurring in their industry and that social media had increased their workloads and work pressures. It was a great study to be involved in and working with Norman, Steve, and Sarah was great. The abstract and links to the article are copied/pasted below.

The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of social media in Chinese sports journalism. After distributing an online survey using a snowball sampling technique, a total of 133 Chinese sports journalists working in print media participated in this study. The results indicated that news gathering was reported as a primary motivation to use social media. Weibo and WeChat, two localized social networking tools, were the most commonly used tools among participants. Nearly half of participating sports journalists admitted that monitoring information on social media increased their pressure level and created workloads. The majority of sports journalists believed social media had weakened their gatekeeping role due to the increase in citizen journalists and the increase in channels and sources from which users obtain news and information. The study also found that the relationship between journalists and athletes has also been altered with the advent of social media.

Download article here: publisher, academia.edu, or researchgate.