Online lecture topics for 8 October #spm2122

Live Tweet topics for 8 October 2013 that starts at 1230 (12:30 PM) Perth time.

The topics will all be listed below with relevant links, but the questions will remain secret until the live chat.

The rationale for this classroom assessment item is:

-To uncover whether the use of social media can be used to foster student engagement in university classroom settings

-To analyse whether a micro-blogging service could enhance:

-the co-creation of unit content,

-enable real-world examples to be brought into the classroom, and

-foster engagement with unit materials

SPM2122 has two textbooks that are used. They are:

Shilbury, D., Quick, S., & Westerbeek, H. (2009) Strategic sport marketing (3rd ed.). Sydney: Allen &

Unwin. See: http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=94&book=9781741756265

Smith, A. C. T. (2008). Introduction to Sport Marketing. Sydney: Elsevier. See:

http://www.elsevier.com/books/introduction-to-sport-marketing/smith/978-0-7506-8685-3

All questions will come from unit (course) materials that were discussed in seminars from week 6 to week 10. Please review the relevant chapters from our reading list, which was:

 

Week 6 please read Chapters 5 and 9
Week 7 please read Chapter 11
Week 8 Please read Chapter 13
Week 9 please read Chapter 14
Week 10 please read Chapter 15 (also live tweet lecture)

Topic 1:

Shilbury et al (2009) suggest that there are four levels of a product (core, facilitating, supporting, and augmented product), which help consumers to satisfy a need or want through consumption (for example, buying season tickets to one’s favourite team).

In our online lecture, we will discuss only supporting products that can add value to the core product and aid to differentiate it from competitors (i.e. membership benefits to season members, access to special events, discounted team merchandise, and many others).

You may be asked to discuss and/or give examples about:

  1. Supporting products that add value to products for people to do sport (i.e. running shoes, a basketball, etc. (these are only examples)
  2. Supporting products that add value for people who purchase season memberships to sport

 

Topic 2:

Distinguished sport marketer Lawrence Wenner (1989) noted that “If the broadcasters [or sport marketers] have done their job well, the sports fan will be attentively viewing when a commercial message appears” (p. 15), which formed part of our discussion in week 7 on sport media and marketing. During our discussion on television, we discussed the ever-increasing avoidance of commercials (during ad breaks) through zapping, online streaming, and digital video recorders.

In our online lecture, we will discuss how contemporary media embed marketing messages into the coverage of sporting events to ensure that a sport fan is “attentively viewing” the marketing message when it appears on screen.

You may be asked to give examples about:

  1. New ways in which sports marketing message appear during game play of sporting events/matches
  2. Listing different ways in which you see marketing messages during sport events/games

 

Topic 3:

In week 7, we discussed the construction of commercial media stories and stories needed to:

  • Contain information to attact public interests
  • Contain some newsworthiness, relationship or meaning to publics
  • “Sell” stories to attract viewers or readers to make money.

Because, the commercial media’s main objective is to attract as large a market as possible to on-sell viewers to advertisers and sponsors in the form of ratings. In our discussion, we focused on how stories needed to connect to the viewer and we watched that clip from Seinfeld to illustrate this. The focus of our online discussion may be and you may be asked for examples of:

  1. How the broadcasts of sport matches contain many varied storylines to attract viewers
  2. How stories are personalised to enable consumers to connect with them

 

Twitter Lecture topics for 27 August 2013 #SPM2122

As many of my readers know, I actively use twitter in my university classroom teaching. In particular, I use it most in my Sport Marketing unit (tagged #spm2122). Twice during the semester, a lecture is replaced by an online discussion on Twitter. The focus of the online lecture is the content from the four weeks prior.  Here are the four topics that will be discussed in a QandA fashion on the 27th of August 2013 that starts at 12:30PM Perth time.

 

Live Tweet topics for 27 August 2013 that starts at 1230 (12:30 PM) Perth time.

The topics will all be listed below with relevant links, but the questions will remain secret until the live chat.

The rationale for this classroom assessment item is:

-To uncover whether the use of social media can be used to foster student engagement in university classroom settings

-To analyse whether a micro-blogging service could enhance:

-the co-creation of unit content,

-enable real-world examples to be brought into the classroom, and

-foster engagement with unit materials

SPM2122 has two textbooks that are used. They are:

Shilbury, D., Quick, S., & Westerbeek, H. (2009) Strategic sport marketing (3rd ed.). Sydney: Allen &

Unwin. See: http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=94&book=9781741756265

Smith, A. C. T. (2008). Introduction to Sport Marketing. Sydney: Elsevier. See:

http://www.elsevier.com/books/introduction-to-sport-marketing/smith/978-0-7506-8685-3

All questions will come from unit (course) materials that were discussed in seminars from week 1 to week 4. Please review the relevant chapters from our reading list, which was:

Week 1 please read Chapters 1 and 2 from the Shilbury et al text

Week 2 please read Chapters 1 & 2 from the Smith text

Week 3 please read Chapter 3 from the Shilbury et al text

Week 4 please read Chapter 4 from the Shilbury et al text

 

Topic 1:

The Smith textbook outlines two streams of sport marking, which is unique to the sports industry. “Sport marketing is the application of marketing concepts to sport products and services, and the marketing of non-sport products through an association to sport. Sport marketing therefore has two key features. First, it is the application of general marketing practices to sport-related products and services. Second, it is the marketing of other consumer and industrial products or services through sport. Like any form of marketing, sport marketing seeks to fulfil the needs and wants of consumers. It achieves this by providing sport services and sport-related products to consumers. However, sport marketing is unlike conventional marketing in that it also has the ability to encourage the consumption of non-sport products and services by association” (Smith, 2008, p. 3). In our online discussion, we will discuss both of these concepts and apply them to sport marketing using social media.

You may be asked to give examples about:
-Marketing of sport on social media
-Marketing through sport on social media using a sport team’s account

 

Topic 2:

Smith (2008) suggests that “the idea of branding is closely linked with positioning. A brand is like an identifying badge, often reinforced by a name or a logo that helps consumers recognise a product or an organisation. A brand becomes linked with consumers’ opinions and perceptions of a sport product and organisation” (p. 115). In week 2, we discussed positioning strategies of various brands.

In the discussion of this topic, you will be asked to give examples of brand attributes “(aspects of the brand that are defining, unique and special to each organisation)” (Smith, p. 118) of several sporting teams. On page 118 of the Smith text, there is an interactive case that might help you in preparing for this topic.

You may be asked to give examples of:
-Unique elements of your favourite sports team
-Distinctive partnerships between a company and an athlete
-Unique elements of a sport company (shoes, bats, media, etc.)

Topic 3:

In week four, we discussed three ways in which sport organisations can collect data. These were: General market data, individual consumer’s data, and competitors and/or participants’ data.

General market data include all the information which relates to the broad environment in which the sport operates. Individual consumer’s data concerns their attitudes and behaviours related to a specific sport product or service. A third source of information for sporting organisations relates to competitors and their participants. It is critical that sporting organisations not only be aware of who their competitors are but also know the consumers of a rival’s products or services (adapted from Shilbury et al., 2009, p. 65).

In our discussion on this topic, we will tweet about the different methods that contemporary sport organisations use to collect data and use new media examples

You may be asked to give examples about:
-How sport teams can incentivise consumers to fill in all items in a form
-The tactics sports organisations use to accurately data mine

 

Topic 4:

The Big 5 Sport Motives represent  a comprehensive view of major psychological inputs that represent core benefits consumer receive from engaging in sport consumption (adapted from Shilbury et al., 2009, p. 49). Various research (Beaton et al., 2007; James et al., 2006) has found that there are “five main psychological benefits that sport consumers desire from a sport experience” (Shilbury et al, 2009, p. 48). These are: Social interaction, performance, excitement, esteem, and diversion.

In our discussion of this topic, we will discuss how sport marketers use the Big 5 sport motives in an attempt to persuade individuals to consume a sporting experience.

You may be asked to give examples about:
-Ads that feature one or more of the Big 5 sport motives to entice consumers to attend a sporting match
-Ads that use the Big 5 sport motives to entice viewership of an event
-Ads using the Big 5 sport motives in an attempt to get people to participate in sport

Topics for #Twitter lecture 8 May 2013 at 12:35PM

Live Tweet topics for 8 May 2013 that starts at 1230 (12:30 PM) Perth time.

The topics will all be listed below with relevant links, but the questions will remain secret until the live chat.

The rationale for this classroom assessment item is:

-To uncover whether the use of social media can be used to foster student engagement in university classroom settings

-To analyse whether a micro-blogging service could enhance:

-the co-creation of unit content,

-enable real-world examples to be brought into the classroom, and

-foster engagement with unit materials

SPM2122 has two textbooks that are used. They are:

Shilbury, D., Quick, S., & Westerbeek, H. (2009) Strategic sport marketing (3rd ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin. See: http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=94&book=9781741756265

Smith, A. C. T. (2008). Introduction to Sport Marketing. Sydney: Elsevier. See:  http://www.elsevier.com/books/introduction-to-sport-marketing/smith/978-0-7506-8685-3

All questions will come from unit (course) materials that were discussed in seminars from week 6 to week 10. Please review the relevant chapters from our reading list, which was:

 Week 6 please read Chapters 5 and 9
Week 7 please read Chapter 11
Week 8 Please read Chapter 13
Week 9 please read Chapter 14
Week 10 please read Chapter 15 (also live tweet lecture)

Topic 1 (carried over from Week 5):

Smith (2008) suggests that “The idea of branding is closely linked with positioning. A brand is like an identifying badge, often reinforced by a name or a logo that helps consumers recognise a product or an organisation. A brand becomes linked with consumers’ opinions and perceptions of a sport product and organisation” (p. 115). In week 2, we discussed positioning strategies of various brands.

In the discussion of this topic, you will be asked to give examples of brand attributes “(aspects of the brand that are defining, unique and special to each organisation)” (Smith, p. 118) of several sporting teams. On page 118 of the Smith text, there is an interactive case that might help you in preparing for this topic.

You may be asked to give examples about:

  1. Unique features of your favourite sports team
  2. Unique features of your favourite sports league/event/competition
  3. Unique features of a sport company

Topic 2:

Shilbury et al (2009) suggest that there are four levels of a product (core, facilitating, supporting, and augmented product), which help consumers to satisfy a need or want through consumption (for example, buying season tickets to one’s favourite team).

In our online lecture, we will discuss only supporting products that can add value to the core product and aid to differentiate it from competitors (for example, membership benefits to season members, access to special events, discounted team merchandise, and many others).

You may be asked to discuss and/or give examples about:

  1. Supporting products that add value to products for people to do sport (i.e. running shoes, a basketball, etc. (these are only examples)
  2. Supporting products that add value for people who purchase season memberships to sport

Topic 3:

Distinguished sport marketer Lawrence Wenner (1989) noted that “If the broadcasters [or sport marketers] have done their job well, the sports fan will be attentively viewing when a commercial message appears” (p. 15), which formed part of our discussion in week 7 on sport media and marketing. During our discussion on television, we discussed the ever-increasing avoidance of commercials (during ad breaks) through zapping, online streaming, and digital video recorders.

In our online lecture, we will discuss how contemporary media embed marketing messages into the coverage of sporting events to ensure that a sport fan is “attentively viewing” the marketing message when it appears on screen.

You may be asked to give examples about:

  1. New ways in which sports marketing message appear during game play of sporting events/matches
  2. Listing different ways in which you see marketing messages during sport events/games

Live Tweet topics for 27 August 2012

Live Tweet topics for 27 August 2012 that starts at 1430 (2:30 PM) Perth time.

On 28 March 2012, I conducted a full lecture online using Twitter. It forms part of an assessment item for my first year unit Sport Marketing (unit code #SPM2122) in the Bachelor of Sport, Recreation, and Leisure. #SPM2122 is doing it again in semester two.

The topics will all be listed below with relevant links, but the questions will remain undisclosed until the live chat.

 

Topic 1:

The 2012 London Summer Olympic Games were touted to be the “social games.” However, the IOC enforced Rule 40 (see: http://www.london2012.com/mm/Document/Publications/General/01/25/29/32/rule-40-guidelines_Neutral.pdf), which prevented athletes, teams, coaches, and others from using social media to discuss non-Olympic sponsors and/or advertisers. See here for another perspective on social media and the Olympics http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/173610/the-social-olympics-the-effect-on-london-2012.html)

 

Topic 2:

On 14 August 2012, the AFL announced that Gilette became the league’s official sponsor of the trade week. Gilette currently sponsors the Grand Final sprint and has a history of sponsorship of the AFL (See: http://www.afl.com.au/news/newsarticle/tabid/208/newsid/144503/default.aspx)

Further, Carlton Draught currently sponsors the substitute player, who is called the Carlton Draught Sub (See: http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/breaking/13962098/afls-alcohol-own-goal/ and http://www.afl.com.au/tabid/208/default.aspx?newsid=138681)

 

Topic 3:

At the beginning of August, A-League club Sydney FC announced its new major sponsor: Webjet (See: http://www.footballaustralia.com.au/sydneyfc/news-display/Sydney-FC-and-Webjet-Agree-Major-Partnership/48392 and http://sportsbusinessinsider.com.au/news/category/sponsorship-and-marketing/sydney-fc-ceo-pignata-secures-webjet-as-main-sponsor-for-two-years/ and http://theworldgame.sbs.com.au/news/1115100/sydney-fc-announces-webjet-deal)

 

Topic 4:

Nike has undergone considerable change in the way it markets itself and how it spends marketing dollars. Nike Digital Sport was lauched at the Nike headquarters in 2010, where devices and technologies are created that allow users to track their sporting prowess. Further, Nike Digital also aims to collect as much personal data on Nike users as it can (See: http://management.fortune.cnn.com/2012/02/13/nike-digital-marketing/)

In August 2012, adidas announced the creation of a social media shoe (See: http://www.sportsnetworker.com/2012/08/13/adidas-social-media-shoe-ready-for-tweeps/ and http://www.ubergizmo.com/2012/08/adidas-unveils-social-media-shoe-for-tweeps/), which the company plans to mass produce in 2016.

 

Topic 5:

Nike has recently started to sponsor UFC fighters: Anderson Silva is sponsored by Nike Brasil (other fighters have national Nike sponsorships) and USA fighter Jon Jones has a global Nike deal, which is the first for Nike and UFC sponsorship. (See: http://www.mmamania.com/2011/8/3/2341775/just-did-it-ufc-middleweight-champion-anderson-silva-lands-nike and http://mmajunkie.com/news/30111/malki-kawa-deal-with-nike-for-ufc-champ-jon-jones-opens-door-for-every-other-fighter.mma and http://www.bloodyelbow.com/2012/8/8/3228539/nike-ufc-jon-jones-global-sponsorship-deal-mma-news).

 

 

Exploring the use of Twitter in university classroom settings: The case of #SPM2122

This is a copy of the submitted abstract to the annual SMAANZ conference co-authored with Alicia Stanway from Edith Cowan University in Perth, Western Australia.

NB: The proposed presentation was accepted without changes on 13 August 2012

Abstract proposal: SMAANZ academic programme, 29-30 November 2012

Name: Olan Kees Martin Scott & Alicia Stanway

Institution: Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia

Since 2008, Twitter has become increasingly popular for many industries to use to communicate promotional offers, company news, and as a public relations tool (Hambrick, 2010; Lowe & Laffey, 2011). Twitter is a micro blogging service where users can send messages, known as Tweets, of 140 characters or less. Twitter enables users to follow other users or companies, which makes content from the author automatically visible to one’s followers.

Several studies have found that the use of social media in a university setting can enable the instructor to develop a community of co-creators of unit (course) content (Retelny, Birnholtz, & Hancock, 2012), enable instructors to bring real-world examples into the unit (Lowe & Laffey, 2011), and foster enhanced engagement with a university unit materials (Junco, Heibergert, & Loken, 2010). This study sought to uncover how university lecturers can effectively utilise Twitter in a classroom setting and whether the use of Twitter leads to positive learning outcomes and enhanced engagement with unit materials.

To test whether the use of Twitter led to enhanced engagement with unit materials and positive learning outcomes, students anonymously completed a questionnaire that included items on whether respondents felt Twitter was an effective university assessment item, how often students had used the Twitter service during the semester, and whether students felt their engagement was enhanced through the use of Twitter. Participants were a purposeful sample of students enrolled in a third year sport marketing unit. The group consisted of primarily full-time (90.7%), domestic students (79.1%). The majority of participants had an existing social media account that they used at least once a month.

The relationship between Twitter as an effective learning resource and unit engagement was investigated using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient. There was a strong positive correlation between the two variables (r = .70, p < .01), with high levels of unit engagement associated with higher levels of perception that Tweeting is an effective learning resource.

The current research suggests that Twitter can be used as an effective university assessment item. Further, relevant findings and their implications for university units will be presented at the conference in Sydney as well as suggestions on how to effectively use social media in a classroom setting to develop co-creators of content, use real-world examples, and foster increased engagement with unit materials.