AMP Tomorrow Fund Grant

On 16 May 2017, I submitted a grant application to the AMP Tomorrow Fund’s grant round for 2018 projects. This was really fun to put together and was also quite the challenge as question answers were limited to 2000 characters, so around 300-400 words. Brevity was definitely my friend for this application, which was a nice change from normal academic work where verbosity is the norm. Fingers crossed, I’m successful with this grant application!

I redacted my application number, hence the black blob.

IMG_20170516_160217

Using self-categorization theory to uncover the framing of the 2015 Rugby World Cup: A cross-cultural comparison of three nations’ newspapers

In the context of international sporting contests, which typically attract great interest globally, the coverage of these events by newspapers help to define, influence, and sometimes reflect mainstream beliefs. Although media consumers have no influence over how stories are framed, editors and journalists can construct their narratives and stories to attract, maintain, and foster continued media consumption (Scott, Zakus, & Hill, 2014; Vincent & Crossman, 2012). Informed by framing theory, this study strove to investigate how two nations’ coverage of the Rugby World Cup (RWC) was characterised. Framing occurs as the media actively select certain aspects of an issue to report, affecting the understanding of the message people receive (Entman, 2007).

We conducted a content analysis of the newspaper coverage of the 2015 RWC in New Zealand, South Africa, and Australia and have recently had it published in the International Review for the Sociology of Sport. This study is currently in press at this journal and is available from the publisher, academia.edu, and researchgate.